About Richard Mullett

Director and Lawyer
Richard.Mullett@TheLegalPartners.com
+44 (0) 7802 66 63 78
City Law Firm : Slaughter and May
In-house Experience : Telecoms: O2, SSE plc (Neos Networks)
                                                             Media & Film: Sohonet

Posts by Richard.Mullett

About Richard Mullett

Director and Lawyer

Richard.Mullett@TheLegalPartners.com
+44 (0) 7802 66 63 78
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City law firm background: Slaughter and May
In house Experience:
Telecoms: O2, SSE plc (Neos Networks)
                                                             Media & Film: Sohonet

Introduction

A lawyer and entrepreneur, Richard is passionate about facilitating growth for UK companies, creating value through exports and working with companies and partners in the UK and ASEAN markets to achieve this.

Richard qualified with Slaughter and May in 1994 and spent 6 years advising blue chip clients, working on joint ventures and the IPOs of Orange, Energis and Colt. He was the lead lawyer on the largest global dual listing ever at the time, of RioTinto Zinc (RTZ) and CRA Mining (in Australia).

In business, Richard’s experience as an in house lawyer extends across directorships in telecommunications, IT, mobile, media and film production networks both in the UK and the Far East. From Slaughter and May, Richard moved in house to O2 where he lead the £160m take over of Martin Dawes in which Vodafone owned a 20% stake. He also lead the team advising on all sports sponsorship and entertainment issues including O2’s sponsorship of England’s rugby team.

Richard was headhunted to the position of Legal Director at Neos Networks, which ranked as one of the fastest growing technology companies in The Times Tech Track 100 in 2002.
He raised over £50m of debt and VC equity finance for the company. He was part of the management team who sold the company to FTSE 100 utility group Scottish and Southern plc in 2003.
After selling Neos Networks Richard founded The Legal Partners in 2003.

Recent Articles by Richard Mullett

How to use Incoterms to de-risk your exports

Posted by on Mar 2, 2014 in Import Export Law for UK & Asia business

How to use Incoterms to de-risk your exports

International Commercial Terms (Incoterms) are internationally recognised standard trade terms used in export contracts or international sales contracts. They are used to make sure the buyer and seller know: who is responsible for the cost of transporting the goods, including insurance, taxes and duties. where the goods should be picked up from and transported to. who is responsible for the goods at each step during transportation The current set of Incoterms is Incoterms 2010. A copy of the full terms is available from the International Chamber of Commerce What do the Incoterms mean? Incoterms are used in contracts in a 3-letter format followed by the place specified...

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Using NDAs to protect confidential information

Posted by on Mar 2, 2014 in Import Export Law for UK & Asia business

Confidentiality agreements (sometimes called Non-Disclosure Agreements (NDAs) or Information-Exchange Agreements) should be signed at an early stage in negotiations, ideally before any information is exchanged. In this article the descriptions Confidentiality agreement and NDA both mean the same agreement. The agreement confirms that both exporter and Asian importer will keep confidential the terms of the negotiations, any sensitive product or service information and the terms of the eventual export contract. It is often the first document entered into, before the document setting out the principles is signed – often called Heads of Agreement or Heads of Terms or...

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Buying a business: avoid the legal pitfalls

Posted by on Feb 28, 2014 in Corporate and Business law for CEOs & CFOs

Buying a business: avoid the legal pitfalls

What is the right structure for the acquisition?  A buyer can buy either the shares of the company that owns the target business or simply buy the assets which make up that business: What is a share purchase? The buyer buys the whole company (including liabilities that it may not know about). What is an asset (or business) purchase? The buyer chooses the assets that it wants to buy. This will provide more flexibility, but it can be complicated to identify and transfer specific assets. What are the tax and accounting issues when Buying a business?  Check how any goodwill on the acquisition is likely to be treated for tax and accounting purposes. Asset deals are...

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Joint Ventures: 25 FAQs – a guide for CEOs and CFOs

Posted by on Feb 25, 2014 in Corporate and Business law for CEOs & CFOs

Joint Ventures: 25 FAQs – a guide for CEOs and CFOs

  Joint Ventures 25 FAQs – a guide for CEOs and CFOs 1  What is a Joint Venture?  A “Joint Venture” is a structure where two (or more) businesses create a separate Joint Venture business to pursue a common goal. But any kind of collaboration with another company could be described as a  Joint Venture. 2  What types of Joint Ventures are there?  There are many examples of collaborations between businesses – common ones are the following structures where two or more people share resources and risk: setting up a separate Joint Venture company where each party has a shareholding and can appoint directors to carry out a specific (and often finite)...

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Bribery Act: how to avoid criminal liability

Posted by on Oct 29, 2013 in Corporate and Business law for CEOs & CFOs, Import Export Law for UK & Asia business

Bribery Act: how to avoid criminal liability

This guide explains the offences introduced by the Bribery Act 2010, the penalties, and highlights practical steps that  business can take to keep within the law. What is bribery? Transparency International (a non-governmental anti-corruption organisation) defines bribery as “the offering, promising, giving, accepting or soliciting of an advantage as an inducement for an action which is illegal or a breach of trust.” Why was the Bribery Act 2010 introduced? The Bribery Act 2010 was introduced to strengthen the existing bribery and corruption laws in the UK. The Organisation of Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) had repeatedly criticised the UK system...

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You know you need a Heads of Terms Agreement when…

Posted by on Sep 24, 2013 in Corporate and Business law for CEOs & CFOs

You know you need a Heads of Terms Agreement when…

…you have a complicated, detailed project to negotiate and you need to get the main points set down  in writing, at the beginning before wasting time and energy negotiating the details in the full contract. A Heads of Terms Agreement Document , also known as a Memorandum of Understanding (or MOU), is extremely useful to show that the main points are now “agreed” and cannot be renegotiated. We can provide you with a standard  Heads of Terms or MOU for you to customise for £199+vat. Contact me directly by email or on 0203 755 5288 to discuss your needs.     A Heads of Terms Agreement (MOU) is important when you need to: 1 Record what are the main...

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Are Settlement Agreements the same as Compromise Agreements?

Posted by on Sep 11, 2013 in Employment law for HR Directors

The answer is “Yes”. Settlement Agreements are designed to achieve the same objective as Compromise Agreements. The Government (Department of Business, Innovation and Skills) has renamed Compromise Agreements as Settlement Agreements so identify more clearly what is happening. Settlement Agreements are needed for an employee to waive all their employment rights (eg discrimination and unfair dismissal) in return for a payment from the employer. ACAS has issued its New Acas Code of Practice. The Code became law on 29 July 2013. It explains how negotiations using a Settlement Agreement can be as simpler and cost-effective way to bring an employment relationship to an...

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Settlement agreements

Posted by on Sep 11, 2013 in Corporate and Business law for CEOs & CFOs, Employment law for HR Directors, General

You are a senior or C Suite Executive. Your employer has offered you a settlement for you to leave the business. It is very important to get the right legal advice about your settlement and if necessary your claim, before agreeing to the terms of a settlement agreement. We can help. Our HR Solicitors have specialist expertise negotiating hundreds of settlement agreements with global organisations. We have been helping senior executives get the best exit deal for over 11 years. Read this article which explains what you need to know, to consider and to do next. For immediate advice and help contact us by email or on 0203 755 5288 directly. What is a...

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Settlement Agreements – What are they, why use them and how to negotiate them?

Posted by on Sep 11, 2013 in Employment law for HR Directors

This Checklist sets out the key issues a business should consider before entering into a settlement agreement with an employee. A Settlement Agreement is the new name for Compromise Agreements. The UK Government (Department for Business, Innovation and Skills) renamed them in July 2013 to promote a culture of trying to resolve issues within the company rather than at an Employment Tribunal. For example employers can now use the new Pre-Termination Negotiations which allow an employer to offer a settlement agreement for an employee to leave by following the ACAS Code of Practice on Settlement Agreements under section 111A of the Employment Rights Act 1996. What is a...

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Redundancy – why must a business offer alternative employment?

Posted by on Sep 11, 2013 in Employment law for HR Directors

Businesses that make redundancies have a duty to look for alternative employment for any potentially redundant employees. A dismissal is likely to be unfair if, at the time of the dismissal, the business did not consider whether any suitable alternative employment existed within its business. This business briefing sets out the key issues a business needs to consider. Extent and duration of the search A business is not obliged to create alternative employment for redundant employees where none already exists. However, the business should make a thorough search for alternative employment and document that search. This will enable the business to show the steps it has...

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Redundancy Checklist

Posted by on Sep 11, 2013 in Employment law for HR Directors

This redundancy checklist summarises the key issues that a business should be aware of when dealing with a redundancy situation. When can a redundancy situation arise? Redundancy encompasses three different types of situation: Business closure. Workplace closure. Reduction of workforce. Collective consultation If a business is making 20 or more employees redundant over a period of 90 days or less, the business must: inform and consult appropriate employee representatives. notify the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS). An employment tribunal can award up to 90 days’ pay for each employee if the business has not consulted adequately. The business...

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TUPE Checklist

Posted by on Sep 11, 2013 in Employment law for HR Directors

Making the Transfer as efficient and liability free as possible: A TUPE Checklist. When does TUPE apply? TUPE applies to a “relevant transfer”. A relevant transfer can be where: A business or part of a business is sold. Work is outsourced from a client to a contractor. Outsourced services are transferred from the original contractor to another contractor or back to the client (ie in-sourced). A client brings the outsourced services back in-house. Further analysis and advice is always needed to confirm whether TUPE applies or not. Whether TUPE does or does not apply will have significant financial implications on any proposed transaction.   Which rights are...

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Top 10 Tips for Avoiding Workplace Claims

Posted by on Sep 9, 2013 in Employment law for HR Directors

Here are our top ten tips for avoiding employment tribunal claims. 1. Ensure that contracts of employments are properly drafted and kept up to date. It is a legal requirement that employers provide employees with a written statement of terms no later than 2 months after their employment begins. There is certain information that must be contained in the written statement of terms which employers need to ensure is contained within their contracts. 2. Tailor your staff handbook to your business. It should contain all the policies which set out best practice on how your managers should deal with day to day personnel matters. Use it to communicate employers’ and...

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